Public Programs

Exhibition open daily, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. through May 27, 2013
3LD Art & Technology Center, 80 Greenwich St., NYC


6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 30, 2013
Presentation:
Little Syria: Lower Manhattan Before the World Trade Center
9/11 Tribute Center
120 Liberty St., NYC 10006
Free; RSVP required

Docents from the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, present the story of our nation’s first large community of Arabic-speaking immigrants, located on Washington Street between the WTC site and Battery Park. Presenters include historian Linda Jacobs and preservationist Todd Fine, co-founder of Save Washington Street and founder of Project Khalid. The program is free and open to the public, but reservations are required due to space limitations; email rsvp@tributewtc.org to ensure your space.


1 p.m. Tuesdays  and Thursdays, May 7, 9, 14, 16, 21 and 23, 2013
Lunch Hour Walking Tour: Downtown’s Lost Neighborhood
Tour begins and ends at 3LD Art & Technology Center, 80 Greenwich St., NYC
Suggested donation $10/person 

Docents from Friends of the Lower West Side lead 45-minute walking tours exploring what remains of the Little Syria neighborhood, and featuring the few remaining landmarks, including the former Syrian Melkite Church and the Downtown Community House.  The route loops along Washington Street, which was the heart of the "Mother Colony" for the many Arab peoples living and working on the Lower West Side. The area is considered to be the first Arab settlement in the United States. Tour begins and ends in the Arab American National Museum exhibition Little Syria, NY: An Immigrant Community’s Life & Legacy at 3LD Art & Technology Center, 80 Greenwich St., NYC.


11 a.m. Sunday, May 12, 2013
Walking Tour: Downtown’s Lost Neighborhood
Tour begins inside the entrance to the South Ferry Staten Island Ferry Terminal at the bottom of the escalators on the left side
Suggested donation $20/person

Joe Svehlak of Friends of the Lower West Side, whose family lived in Little Syria, NY, leads a two-hour walking tour exploring the diverse immigrant history of Manhattan's Lower West Side. This tour features the few remaining landmarks, including the former Syrian Melkite Church and the Downtown Community House.  From the 1840s through the 1960s, waves of Irish and German immigrants, followed by peoples from the former Ottoman Empire, and from Central and Eastern Europe, lived mostly in the old streets west of Trinity Church from Liberty Street to The Battery. The route follows Washington Street, the heart of the "Mother Colony" for the many Arab peoples living and working on the Lower West Side. The area is considered to be the first Arab settlement in the United States. The tour ends at the Arab American National Museum exhibition Little Syria, NY: An Immigrant Community’s Life & Legacy at 3LD Art & Technology Center, 80 Greenwich St., NYC.


6:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 15, 2013
Reading: A Journey in Words – The Poetry and Prose of Arab New York
Kray Hall, Poets House
10 River Terrace, NYC 10282
Free admission

An evening of recitation, music and film celebrating the early immigrant writers and their contemporary descendants. Reception follows.
 
Made possible through Poets House's Literary Partners Program


10 a.m. Saturday, May 18, 2013
Walking Tour: From Little Syria to Brooklyn's Atlantic Avenue
Begins at the northwest corner of Court and Remsen Streets, Brooklyn
Suggested donation $20/person

Mary Ann Haick DiNapoli of Friends of the Lower West Side leads a 90-minute walking tour exploring the history and present-day delights of Brooklyn's earliest Arab American community, in the historic neighborhoods of Brooklyn Heights and Cobble Hill. Learn how and why this area around lower Atlantic Avenue became an immigrant settlement in the late 1800s and discover its ties to Washington Street's Little Syria.


6:30-8:30 p.m. Monday, May 20, 2013
Lecture: Little Syria, NY: History to Advocacy
Room 9204/05, The Graduate Center, City University of New York (CUNY)
365 Fifth Ave., NYC 10016
Free and open to the public

Dr. Akram Khater, professor of history at North Carolina State University and a specialist in the history of the Middle East and Arab relations/studies, will discuss the history of Syrian/Levantine immigration. Preservationist Todd Fine from Save Washington Street presents the latest on efforts to save the neighborhood’s two remaining original structures. Nancy Foner, Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Hunter College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York (CUNY), and a specialist in immigration, offers a summary and puts Arab immigration into larger context.

Presented by the Middle East and Middle East American Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY and co-sponsored by the Arab American National Museum and The Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Students at NYU

13624 Michigan Avenue, Dearborn, MI 48126 - Phone (313) 582-AANM (2266) A Project of ACCESS